About Malta

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Malta Expats | About Malta
The Maltese archipelago consists of a number of small islands – mainly Malta (the main island), Gozo, Comino, Cominotto, St Paul’s Islands, Filfla and Manoel Island. Only Malta, Gozo and Comino are inhabited. This archipelago lies in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. These islands are almost arid, rocky and devoid of natural resources, except for globigerina limestone, which is used for building and sea salt. However, since this archipelago is blessed with many hours of sunshine, solar energy has been developed in recent years.

 

Malta Profile

Malta Expats | About MaltaStarting off the Malta-Profile, this article will give you a brief but comprehensive overview about Malta, its history, culture and social-economic set-up. While you can find more detailed stories and printable guides in the menu of this Malta-Profile section, the introduction below will guide you through the most important information about Malta.
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Parched fields lined with rubble walls and agrobuildings, such as the girna and the razzett, are distinctive and form an integral part of the Maltese countryside. Typical villages, with their flat-roofed houses and small chapels in narrow streets and alleys have survived. These still have their characteristic tiny shop full of items for sale jammed right up to its entrance. The village greengrocer and the baker still exist along these streets. In these villages, the most dominant feature is the baroque parish church with its bell towers and the dome reaching towards the blue sky. The heart of these villages is the main square enclosed by townhouses, buildings housing band and political parties clubs, and traditional bars serving pastizzi and coffee or tea. Even the parish priest’s office is usually found in or near this square, while the local police station is often located in a nearby street. Every old village has its own ‘Main Street’, which in the past was referred to by the locals as ‘ Stradarjali’ (‘Kingsway’). In this street one sees more townhouses and possibly other old chapels and a shop or two.

Malta Expats | About MaltaVisiting Malta

Maltese Archipelago lies virtually in the center of the Mediterranean Sea, 93km south of the Italian island of Sicily, 400km west of the Tunisian coast. Yet Malta is just a few hours flying time from most mainland European cities and has excellent intercontinental connections…
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Malta Expats | About MaltaWorking on Malta

Malta always was a very popular destination for expatriates to live and work. In the times before EU-accession, the most popular sections where international manufacturing corporations, finance and, of course, tourism…
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Malta Expats | About MaltaLiving in Malta

Once the decision is made the fun (and work) really begins. Of course, there are many similarities, especially when you immigrate from the UK. Malta’s EU membership has also done its part to present a lot of familiar shops, goods or even services to the newbies. But then again, Malta is also a place with a manifold and partially complex history. Traditions, conventions and even certain facilities find their origin in the past, influencing life to this day…
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Malta Expats | About MaltaAdministration

Malta has a fairly conservative business culture. The Republic of Malta is a representative democracy: the President of the Republic who is also Head of State and has a mainly representative role, is elected every five years by the House of Representatives…
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Malta Expats | About MaltaGallery

Malta’s towns, villages, hamlets and the countryside are rich in niches. Sometimes, one meets a niche along some narrow winding street or at the beginning of a sheltered alley. At other times, one can see them among rubble walls along countryside paths. We find two types of niches: those which have a cover and those that are free standing. These niches stand testimony to the faith of the Maltese through the ages…
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BeachesMalta Expats | About Malta

The sea is a vital part of our Maltese culture, it has colored our history, and it will color any visit to the islands. It is sensuous in summer, and restless in winter, and it is lovely to be by, in or on the sea. You could relax on the beach, discover sandy coves and rocky inlets which are almost deserted even in high summer. Many beaches offer watersports such as, windsurfing, sea kayaking, jet ski hire, paragliding, wake boarding and sailing…
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Large old towns also continue to breathe. Some of them were elevated to the status of city either by the Grandmasters of the Order of St John of Jerusalem, Rhodes and Malta, or by the British. A few of these cities were surrounded by kilometers of defense walls, making them gems of fortified cities. Cases in point are Mdina, Valletta and its suburb Floriana, the Three Cities (Vittoriosa, Cospicua and Senglea) and Gozo’s Citadella.
The Maltese archipelago supports a large population that has created its own characteristics, distinguishing itself from its neighbors in Sicily and North Africa. These characteristics are the center of attraction for the visiting tourist who is keen to get to know Malta better during his or her stay. Some have been included in this book to help the reader to better appreciate the Maltese heritage – a heritage which was handed down from one generation to another, making the Maltese archipelago unique and at the same time European and Mediterranean.

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